Tag Archives: Featured

FORD NATIONALS, CARLISLE, PENNSYLVANIA JUNE 1-3, 2018

Carlisle Ford Nationals, June 1-3, 2018

Saleen Automotive weekend hospitality tent

MEET STEVE SALEEN OF SALEEN AUTOMOTIVE
Hall of Famer Comes to Carlisle During Ford Weekend

A very popular name within automotive circles is coming to Carlisle courtesy of Saleen Automotive. Steve Saleen was born in California and attended USC, earning a degree in business. He parlayed his education into a booming career that saw him work with the Porsche Owners Club before becoming a competitive racer. In 1980, he entered the Formula Atlantic series and was third in the final series standings. After that, he advanced to the SCCA Trans-Am series in ’82, driving a Ford Mustang. From there, his passion for the Mustang grew immensely, culminating with the founding of Saleen Autosport in 1983 and subsequent building of the first Saleen Mustang.

In 1984, the car was completed, tested and raced against some of the world’s top cars, finishing first in its class at the Mosport 24 hour endurance race. Years later, Saleen formed a race team with comedian Tim Allen and driver Bob Bondurant. The three raced Saleen Mustangs in the SCAA World Challenge. Inducted into the Mustang Hall of Fame in 1996 along side Carroll Shelby, Saleen remains active today, primarily with his namesake company, Saleen Inc.

Since establishing Saleen Automotive, the company has gone on to build countless Mustangs and Ford products. Saleen cars and trucks are seen as one of the top brands in the Ford market. Saleen also had a hand in the 2005-2006 Ford GT cars. Don’t miss out as Steve Saleen meets and greets with enthusiasts and does an autograph signing or two. Steve Saleen will be located in the Saleen Automotive booth located near the stage. Appearance and Autograph times are still to be announced so follow this page and our Carlisle Ford Nationals Facebook page.

Don’t miss a chance to meet Steve Saleen at Carlisle in 2018!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Vehicle Classes:
131: MUSTANG – 1984 – 1993 SALEEN
133: MUSTANG – 1994 – 2004 SALEEN
135: MUSTANG – 2005 – 2014 SALEEN
137: MUSTANG – 2015 – Present SALEEN
139: SALEEN POWERED (truck, Focus, S7, etc)

CLUB:
Choose SALEEN OWNERS AND ENTHUSIASTS CLUB in the club drop down menu on registration to help us help you.

Carlisle Events Website:
www.carsatcarlisle.com

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Gate-N-Go: Your Green Light to the Showfield

Register for the 2018 Carlisle Ford Nationals Showfield. Registration includes weekend admission for two people. To qualify for the 10% Gate-N-Go pre-registration discount and have your entry window sticker mailed to you, please pre-register prior to April 30th, 2018 at midnight EST. Discount will be applied at checkout. After registering, a receipt will be emailed to you – please bring this receipt to the event. If you belong to a club, enter the full club name. Please do not abbreviate the club name.

https://store.carlisleevents.com/

Click here to participate in the discussion.

COMPANY WEEK: SALEEN AUTOMOTIVE INC.

2019 Saleen 1 with Steve Saleen
2019 Saleen 1 with Steve Saleen

By: DAN SANCHEZ on March 27, 2018 at 10:02 am MDT
Original Article: COMPANYWEEK.COM

Saleen Automotive Inc.
www.saleenautomotive.com
Corona, CA
Founded 1984
Employees: 50
Privately Owned
Industry: Industrial/Equipment
Products: Automobile Original Equipment Manufacturer

Amy Boylan continues to build on Steve Saleen’s performance automobile brand using social media and lean manufacturing practices.

Amy Boylan’s path to a leadership role at California’s iconic Saleen Automotive is a road well traveled — mostly by men. But after a stint as president and COO at Shelby American and COO at West Coast Customs, Boylan’s less focused on glass ceilings than she is on stewarding an enduring brand that’s broken the rules of American automotive OEMs by transforming iconic automotive platforms into custom, high-performance machines.

Amy Boylan COO Saleen Automotive
Amy Boylan COO Saleen Automotive

“Steve Saleen has built a legacy and a brand that has lasted more than 34 years,” says Boylan, president and COO at Saleen Automotive since June 2017. “That’s what attracted me to the company. He’s weathered both good and bad times, but the automobiles he’s created remain collectible and beautiful, making the brand timeless.”

Enduring some ups and downs over the years, the car manufacturer has never stopped producing vehicles and aftermarket accessories. “Steve developed a car every single year for 34 years,” says Boylan. The company is most commonly known for its Saleen 302 on the Mustang platform, a high performance version of the Ford Mustang with a redesigned body, drivetrain and interior that delivers higher performance.

“Steve also built the S7, the first American supercar which has its own extensive history winning races,” says Boylan. “The new S1 is his latest design, an affordable supercar that can reach 180 mph. We like to call it – a sports car with a supercar pedigree.” Because of these achievements and capabilities, the company is recognized as an original equipment manufacturer, not a tuner. “We are an OEM,” says Boylan. “We’re like a smaller high-end company like Porsche or Ferrari. We get pre-titled vehicles from dealers but we go through all the required testing that all OEMs do.”

Saleen S7 LM Edition
Saleen S7 LM Edition

The market has been good lately, and the company continues to grow with its manufacturing roots in California. “Everything is done here in Southern California,” says Boylan. “From the design, engineering, and even getting additional parts from local suppliers.” To improve efficiency, Boylan adopted station building, a technique first developed by Toyota. “When you station-build, you can figure out who is doing things correctly, and who needs more training,” says Boylan. “Teams sign off on a vehicle when it leaves their station and they own that build. Then everything goes under post inspection. If there’s something that goes wrong, and we see it being repeated, we can retrain or re-educate the team. This is important when you’re expanding the lines and taking the company to the next level.”

Boylan points out that Saleen’s way of building vehicles isn’t the same as having a bunch of workers bolting on parts. “Most mechanics and car builders have their own way of doing things. That may not work well here so we retrain,” says Boylan. “Steve is adamant about keeping records and keeping manufacturing consistent. Everything has to be exact.”

Saleen interior design - Saleen Automotive
Saleen interior design – Saleen Automotive

The company also works with many vendors who must maintain that same high level of quality on their end. “We tell our vendors what we expect and show them the quality that it has to be,” says Boylan. “Everything must be done well and consistent. We look at every part that comes in and can send parts back to our vendors, so they can make it right. Steve believes, and I agree, that we have to touch everything so that the vehicle looks and sounds like a Saleen.”

Boylan realizes that keeping the brand growing involves embracing social media on many levels. The company has Facebook and Instagram pages, and she personally engages online to speak with vehicle owners. “We have customers who have a 1984 Saleen and we still make parts for those cars,” says Boylan. “We still support and talk to them. It’s important to talk to customers who have kept loyal to the brand.”

Ford GT, Saleen 1, Saleen S7 Competition
Ford GT, Saleen 1, Saleen S7 Competition

Needs: “You can never have enough equipment and people,” says Boylan. “In this area of California, it’s hard to find workers. Where we are now, in Corona, California, it’s a great place for a middle-class lifestyle, but not the best place to find executive level employment. Most people at that level are transplants and that’s sometimes difficult.

Challenges: “Trying to grow at the speed we need,” says Boylan. “We have turned a corner and are trying to keep up with a growing demand. We have created licensing deals with China to build vehicles over there, but all cars for North America will be designed, engineered, and built in the U.S. There are people here building to design stuff overseas. It’s the same for anyone building a car from scratch.”

Opportunities: “Steve has never been pigeonholed into one thing,” says Boylan. “He helped build the Ford GT for Ford, He also helped with the Dodge Viper. He’s brilliant in finding new opportunities. The new Saleen 1 (S1) for example breaks the mold for a $100K carbon fiber sports car that can reach 180 mph.”

Saleen Automotive, Corona CA
Saleen Automotive, Corona CA

[Source: CompanyWeek]

HAGERTY: FOX-BODY SALEEN MUSTANGS

Fox-body Saleen Mustangs: Why I’m buying them

By: COLIN COMER on November 27, 2017
Original Article: HAGERTY.COM

I saw a 1988 Saleen Mustang heading to the block at Barrett-Jackson. Not just any Saleen, but serial number 01—the one that was a development mule and appeared in all of the brochures. It was even a magazine test car and then Steve Saleen’s personal car. I followed it to the block and stood there as it bounced around numbers I thought seemed very cheap considering the car’s pedigree. I bid. And three minutes later the crack of the auctioneer’s hammer declared me the owner of 1988 Saleen #01.

1988 Saleen Mustang (serial #01)
1988 Saleen Mustang (serial #01)

Think Carroll Shelby was the only racer who hopped up Mustangs that went on to win championships? Nope. Steve Saleen did the same thing a couple of decades later with his Fox-body Saleen Mustangs. Starting in 1984, and using a similar formula to what Shelby employed on the original 1965–66 GT350s, Saleen focused on chassis, suspension, and braking upgrades to the factory Mustang. Shelby called it making “a racehorse out of a mule.”

And once again, it worked.

Steve Saleen and his Saleen Mustangs took home many racing wins, including the 24 Hours of Mosport (an SCCA Endurance Championship race) three years in a row, from 1986–88. The Saleen Mustang team won the 1987 SCCA Escort Endurance Championship Driver, Team, and Manufacturer titles for the series, and in 1993 the Saleen Mustang team placed third and fifth in the SCCA World Challenge championship. Not bad for a racer-turned-manufacturer that started with a car with decidedly humble beginnings. The 5.0-liter Fox Mustang was great, and it brought real performance back to the masses. But at the end of the day it was, well…still a 1978 Fairmont underneath.

In the 20 years between Shelby hot-rodding 1965 K Code Mustangs and Saleen attempting the same with 1984 Mustangs, a few more hurdles cropped up. Gone were the days of manufacturers freely swapping intakes, carburetors, and exhaust systems with any aftermarket parts they wanted. Saleen couldn’t do any engine modifications if he wanted to avoid trouble with the EPA, so he left the engine, exhaust, and drivetrain alone during his conversions. The upshot was that this preserved Ford’s factory warranty, which was another important aspect. Saleen did add a stiffened Racecraft suspension, custom wheels, sticky General tires, and a body kit that not only looked cool but likely offered some degree of aerodynamic benefit. As the years went on, Saleen slowly ramped up the modifications to include five-lug wheels, four-wheel disc brakes, and further interior upgrades, including trick Flofit front seats.

1989 Ford Mustang Saleen Fastback (Mecum)
1989 Ford Mustang Saleen Fastback (Mecum)

In its day, the Saleen Mustang was a pretty stout package that also came with undeniable street cred. It earned that reputation in no small part because, like the original Shelby Mustangs, the Saleen was an obtainable giant-killer. An underdog that punched well above its weight. A better, exclusive version of the 5.0-liter Mustang that was already the car everybody wanted.

And I was on that list. In the 1980s there was a Ford dealership situated between my grade school and my parents’ house. I wandered that lot at least once a day, oftentimes twice. In doing so I became friends with the lowest men on that dealership’s totem pole, guys I thought had the perfect job—the lot boys and the “get ready” car prep guys. These dudes had it made, at least as far as I was concerned. They were the first to drive the new cars in from the transport trucks, and they got to unwrap, clean, and drive them around some more! Well, at least to the front line or up the ramp to the second floor storage lot. Which was conveniently lubricated with years worth of tire dressing. Hmmm.

In 1983, the Mustang GTs started rolling in. In ’84, the new “GT350” limited-production specials came out. I was a kid so I had no idea they were a “GT350” in name only, or that Shelby was going after Ford for trademark infringement. Yet as cool as they looked, they just didn’t have the bite to match their visual bark. Then came electronic fuel injection and roller camshafts, and the continuous development of the 5.0-liter that made it into a killer. The burnouts these new 225-horsepower cars could do on the ramp made that very clear.

1987 Saleen Mustang front 3/4
1987 Saleen Mustang front 3/4
1988 Saleen Mustang Convertible and 1987 Saleen Mustang Hatchback
1988 Saleen Mustang Convertible and 1987 Saleen Mustang Hatchback

By this time I was off to high school and in possession of a crisp new driver’s license. That, of course, heightened my awareness of what car I’d buy if I won the lottery. I got my answer instantly upon seeing an episode of Motorweek in early 1988, when a new Saleen Mustang was tested. It was white with blue stripes, and John Davis couldn’t say enough good things about it. It was a “racer for the street” and showed “just how much more a Mustang could be.” The Saleen also trounced the new ASC McLaren Mustang the Saleen went up against in the test. And this alone really sealed the deal, since a kid in my high school had received an ASC McLaren convertible from his parents. Oh, to get a Saleen and have the chance to heads-up race that oblivious kid from the other side of the tracks! It was the stuff of dreams. One, like many, that would have to wait.

Fast-forward a few more decades, to the point when I found myself at that certain age when nostalgia suddenly becomes more of an issue. I watched as Fox-body 5.0-liter Mustangs, new cars in my formative years, became collectible, and I started looking for one in earnest. Then I saw a 1988 Saleen Mustang heading to the block at Barrett-Jackson. Not just any Saleen, but serial number 01—the one that was a development mule and appeared in all of the brochures. It was even a magazine test car and then Steve Saleen’s personal car. I followed it to the block and stood there as it bounced around numbers I thought seemed very cheap considering the car’s pedigree. I bid. And three minutes later the crack of the auctioneer’s hammer declared me the owner of 1988 Saleen #01.

They say never meet your heroes, but the Saleen didn’t disappoint when I drove it. It was a riot. Everything a good Fox-body car should be but far more raw, with a punishingly stiff Racecraft suspension. It drives just like you’d expect a slightly more modern early Shelby to drive, but with A/C, power steering, and really good brakes. It has just enough power to drive it tail-out almost anywhere you want, making freeway ramps into all kinds of sideways fun. And the car is very well balanced and predictable, at least on smooth roads.

1987 Saleen Mustang - courtesy of Colin Comer
1987 Saleen Mustang – courtesy of Colin Comer

All of this fun with #01 led me to look at other Fox Body Saleens as they came up for sale. For the price of one vintage Shelby Mustang you could fill an airplane hangar full of them. I focused on 1987–89 model years primarily because they combined five-lug wheels, the Flofit interior, and also pre-dated the airbag steering wheel that arrived in 1990. The earlier “four-eyed” Saleen Mustangs from 1984–86, of course, are also desirable because of their even smaller production numbers, unique early features such as three-piece front air dams, 15-inch wheels, and other details that show how the cars (and production) evolved quickly. Plus, the 1984-86 cars feature the arguably more attractive quad headlights with cool Saleen-installed Plexiglas covers.

Ground Effect Kit 90-93 Saleen Mustang SC
Ground Effect Kit 90-93 Saleen Mustang SC
Ground Effect Kit 88-89 Saleen Mustang SSC
Ground Effect Kit 88-89 Saleen Mustang SSC

A handful of years later, the heritage, affordable cost of entry, and off-the-charts fun factor has resulted in a herd of Saleens following me home (six, at this writing, to be exact). Insanity? I don’t think so, and here’s my defense: Again, much like those first Shelby Mustangs, Saleen was a small manufacturer finding its way with a specialized product. The conversion also wasn’t cheap; in 1987 it was a roughly $7,500 more than the base Mustang LX 5.0-liter’s $13,000 base price. As a result the production numbers are very low, totaling just hundreds each year. And, very much in parallel with Shelbys, every Saleen Mustang is serialized and can be documented, in this case by contacting Saleen directly. Club support is fantastic as well; Saleen owners are a passionate group who love their cars. Both bode well for the future of these cars because the fakes are being filtered out and the good cars are being cherished.

Which brings me to another point: The attrition rate for Saleen Mustangs is surprisingly high, either as a result of wrecks, thefts, or simply cars falling into the wrong hands or being destroyed by modifications. So as the market matures and collectors seek out truly elite-grade examples, the few examples of great, stock, low mileage Saleens that remain among the original limited production run protect the model’s future value.

The best part? Right now a good early Saleen carries a very small premium over what some of the best Fox-body 5.0-liter Mustangs are bringing. It seems as close to a no-brainer proposition as there is, especially in today’s increasingly hot 1980s collector car market. Even though prices have noticeably jumped in the last three years or so, you’re not too late to the Saleen party. There are still pretty fantastic Saleens for under $30K, and it’s possible to stumble on a great deal for much less. I’ve seen nice “driver-level” cars which sell for as little as $15K, but I have also noticed the supply dwindle considerably in the last two years. And we all know how the law of supply and demand works.

Don’t get me wrong, I am not predicting people will get rich off these things in the near future. But I sure think in another 10 to 20 years there will be another comparison to draw between Shelby and Saleen Mustangs—that they both really hit their stride value-wise when they turned 40. And even if I’m totally wrong about that, I don’t think anybody who buys one will complain after the fun they’ll have with it in the years to come.

And that’s why I’m still buying them.

P.S. If you have a really great Saleen for sale, please disregard all of the above. Just contact me so I can buy your car.

[Source: Hagerty]

VIDEO: 2018 SALEEN 1 DEBUTS DURING LA AUTO SHOW

Text By: JAKE HOLMES on November 30, 2017
Original Article: MOTOR1.COM

2018 Saleen S1 Is A 180 MPH, $100K Carbon Fiber Supercar Debut at los angeles auto show 2017.

The two-seater, mid-engine car packs a turbocharged 2.5-liter inline-four engine that was developed by Saleen. With 450 horsepower (336 kilowatts) and 350 pound-feet (474 Newton-meters) of torque, it’ll get to 60 miles per hour in a claimed 3.5 seconds and through the quarter-mile in 11.3 seconds. The top speed is claimed at 180 mph, and Saleen says the S1 pulls 1.2 g of cornering grip on a skidpad, thanks in part to its Continental ExtremeContact Sport tires.

The launch transmission is a six-speed manual, but Saleen says that the company will launch a paddle-shifter dual-clutch option “at some point.”

Inside the car, the simple dashboard consists of a digital instrument cluster behind the small, three-spoke steering wheel, with a secondary infotainment system on the center stack.

On the sidelines of the car’s debut, Steve Saleen said that the reason he wanted to make a more affordable supercar was that it will allow for greater sales and production volumes. He expects to build 1,500-2,000 S1s per year for the U.S., with a similar number for Europe and a “substantial” number for China. Interested customers can place a $1,000 deposit starting today.

Click here to participate in the discussion.

[Source: Saleen Owners and Enthusiasts Club]

REAR VIEW: 86-0068 & GRASSROOTS RACING

PHOTOS & TEXT EXCERPTS: GEORGE CHABAL

“Original owner with 10,000 miles, original paint and interior. 86-0068 was special ordered as a stripped down Mustang from Ford and drop shipped to Saleen Autosport for the Saleen conversion. Car was purchased to compete in SCCA Solo II.”

86-0068 Saleen Mustang
86-0068 Saleen Mustang, competition debut

The ’80s were a relaunch of factory-backed racing efforts from Ford Motor Company. Earlier in the decade, with the birth of Special Vehicle Operations, FMC became a global juggernaut in all forms of vehicle racing through their Ford Motorsport program lead by Michael Kranefuss. While Detroit was busy forming Goliath; a little-known Californian upstart run by Steve Saleen approached the Motorsport operation with his plan to remanufacture 5-Liter Mustangs into an uncompromised, signature series, street-legal, niche performance vehicle. With SVOs blessing, the Saleen Mustang concept became a welcomed addition to FMCs Motorsport agenda and their “Racing into the Future” marketing vision.

“Saleen had said this car was what they would have done if they were to sell a R-version to the public. At the time they were out of the Hurst shifters for the street cars, but since they knew I would be racing this one; Saleen took a backup shifter from their race team to install into 86-0068.”

86-0068 Saleen Mustang
86-0068 Saleen Mustang

1986 was Saleen Autosport’s debut year into SCCA road racing. Their ’86 model year signature package was approved for SCCA Showroom Stock Endurance Series in class SS/GT. Saleen would compete with SCCA’s entire calendar of events; winning the prestigious 24 Hours of Mosport race late in the season. While the factory racing team was busy scraping paint with Porsche and Corvette on a national stage, effort was also made to endorse Saleen Mustang sales to regional racers seeking a value added, sanction approved performance package, for their dreams of clinching the checkered flag. Through Saleen Autosport’s grassroots support program; experienced racers could special order a new vehicle and qualify for competition incentives throughout their competition season.

“86-0068 was the first Saleen Mustang shipped to Pennsylvania. After I took delivery Steve Saleen called me and asked if I was willing to take my car to New York for a Koni advertising photo shoot. I mentioned to Steve I had to make sure could take time away from work. When I called back the following day Saleen had made other arrangements because of their short lead time.”

George Chabal, of western Pennsylvania, was one of Saleen Autosport’s earliest competition customers. With an eye on the SCCA Solo II Series, George contacted Steve Saleen on how best to order a new Mustang for club racing. With Steve’s assistance they ordered a Bright Red 5-Liter LX hatchback with tinted glass, light group, power lock group and Ford radio delete. Other equipment would include Saleen’s standard Kenwood sound system, Ford Mustang GT seating and Hurst short-throw shifter; George would arrive to PA SCCA events in style.

86-0068 SCCA SOLO RECORDS

DRIVER: GEORGE CHABAL
I. Regional
A. Class Champion 1987-2001 ESP, 1999 Driver of the Year; Steel Cities Region SCCA
B. Year End Points Champion North Hills Sports Car Club
1. Most number of total & consecutive starts for Driver since 1958
1984, 1987-1990, 1993-1994

86-0068 Saleen Mustang
86-0068 Saleen Mustang

II. SCCA NEDIV Divisional
A. 2nd, Best Finish
B. 1st, 1995

III. SCCA CENDIV Divisional
A. 1st, 1998

IV. SCCA National Tours
A. Evansville, IN 1993: 3rd
B. Norfolk, VA, 1994: 2nd
C. Evansville, IN, 1994: 3rd
D. Pittsburgh, PA, 1996: 1st
V. PA State Championships
A. 1st, 1992
B. 2nd, 1993
C. 2nd, 1994
D. 1st, 1995

VI. SCCA SOLO II Nationals, Salina, KS
A. Middle of group, 1990-1992,1994
B. 8th 1996
C. 7th 1997

CO-DRIVER: LADIES CLASS
I. Regional
A. Class Champion 1983-1997 ESPL, Steel Cities Region SCCA
B. 2nd year end points North Hills Sports Car Club 1995

86-0068 Saleen Mustang
86-0068 Saleen Mustang

II. SCCA NEDIV Divisional
A. 1st 1983-1986, 1991-1997
B. 2nd 1987-1990, 1999

III. SCCA National Tour
A. Evansville, IN: 2nd 1993
B. Evansville, IN: 1st 1994
C. Norfolk, VA: 1st 1994

IV. PA State Championships
A. 1st 1992-1995
B. 2nd 1999

V. SCCA SOLO II Nationals, Salina, KS
A. 4th 1989
B. 3rd 1991
C. 2nd 1992
D. 3rd 1994
E. 5th 1995 (Topeka)
F. 2nd 1996
G. 1st 1997

86-0068 Saleen Mustang
86-0068 Saleen Mustang

Produced by Saleen Autosport using their facility at Burch Ford in La Habra California and shipped to Bures Ford in early May; 86-0068 was an unusual Saleen Mustang conversion given the lack of air conditioning, power windows and featuring a light grey Momo steering wheel.

For the 1986 model year Saleen produced 201 serialized Mustangs, 198 were street models with three competition prepared vehicles. The body style breakdown of those street models are, 187 hatchbacks and 11 convertibles.

Of the 187 street prepared hatchbacks, it is known that 47 were painted Bright Red (paint code 2R). Of those, 44 featured Charcoal interiors. All 44 were equipped with 5-speed manual transmissions, while 43 were built from the LX 5-Liter platform.

Closer examination of these 44 Bright Red with Charcoal interior conversions reveal, 35 were equipped with Saleen’s Kenwood Stereo. Of the 187 street prepared hatchbacks 86-0068 is one of three with delete features and one of three known with a light grey Momo steering wheel.

Click here to participate in the discussion.

[Source: George Chabal]

SALEEN ANNOUNCES SEVEN NEW LIMITED EDITION S7’s

TEXT: DANIEL WEBSTER

Saleen S7 LM
Saleen S7 LM

Saleen Automotive Inc. (OTCQB: SLNN) Corona, CA – (September 17, 2016)
This year marks the 20th Anniversary of the beginning of a 7-year consecutive run of racing championships for Saleen. Sequentially from 1996 through 2002 Saleen clinched more than a dozen racing championships across the globe, with every test, race, and win contributing to the DNA makeup of the Saleen S7.

To commemorate these historic motorsport victories, Saleen has announced a new limited edition model, the Saleen S7 LM. Only 7 examples of this limited edition S7 will be produced and all will incorporate a unique livery, wheel, interior, and functional performance enhancements.

“True to our form, we are bringing back America’s only true supercar,” said Steve Saleen, President and CEO of Saleen Automotive, “We are celebrating our winning heritage and advancing the performance DNA that Saleen was built around.”

The Saleen S7 was initially unveiled in Monterey, CA. Labeled as America’s Supercar, it is the most successful supercar model ever. The S7R race version has won at every major racetrack in the world, including Daytona, Sebring, Nurburgring, and the prestigious 24 Hours of LeMans. The street version has starred in several Hollywood blockbusters, including being driven by “God” in Bruce Almighty.

The new S7 LM supercar will be powered by a 7.0L twin-turbo engine rated at 1,000 horsepower and each one will be hand built at Saleen’s Corona, CA headquarters.

For more information on how to purchase a Saleen, contact sales@saleen.com. For investor questions, please email ir@saleen.com.

Click here to participate in the discussion.

[Source: Saleen Automotive]