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SALEEN CUP RACING SERIES DEBUTS AT PORTLAND INTERNATIONAL RACEWAY

S1 Cup Logo

Twelve drivers in two distinct classes competed in Portland, July 12-14, as part of an “arrive and drive” racing series showcasing the new Saleen 1 sports car

Brandon Davis of Sonoma, Calif. and Paul Terry of Nephi, Utah led 50-minute race, taking top podium finish during inaugural Saleen Cup event

PORTLAND, Ore. (July 16, 2019) – History was made at Portland International Raceway this week as California-based Saleen Automotive officially returned to motorsports with its debut of the Saleen Cup – an “arrive-and-drive” series designed to demonstrate the capabilities of its recently announced Saleen 1 turbocharged mid-engine sports car.

Brandon Davis of Sonoma, Calif. and Paul Terry of Nephi, Utah led a hotly contested 50-minute race on Sunday, July 14 as part of a shared team in the Saleen Cup “Pro-Am” class, taking top honors at the inaugural event. As one of the most successful marques in GT racing history, the Portland race marked a significant milestone for Saleen Automotive, led by legendary racing driver and high-performance vehicle pioneer Steve Saleen.

“We’re extremely proud of our Saleen Cup debut in Portland and our company’s official return to motorsports,” said Steve Saleen, CEO and founder of Saleen Automotive.

“This series serves as our platform to develop the Saleen 1 street model and it’s already proving to be very competitive on the track. We’re thankful for our team drivers and the Saleen crew for their major effort during this event and look forward to the next race in Watkins Glen.”

The Saleen Cup delivers a professional-quality racing experience, with a grid of fully prepared Saleen 1 Cup Cars featuring Iconic, Contemporary and Saleen racing liveries in bold, designer colorways. Full trackside support and hospitality amenities add to the professional-level racing experience. The cars are prepared and transported to each race by Saleen, so it represents a true “arrive and drive” series that offers a fast-tracked entry into motorsports.

A Pro-Amateur (Pro-Am) class invites experienced drivers to be among the first to spend time behind the wheel of the new 450hp turbocharged 2.2-liter, four-cylinder Saleen 1 Cup Car. The Pro-Am class debuts in Portland with eight drivers, including Martina Kwan; Brandon Davis; Paul Terry; Johan Schwartz; Zachary Lee; Bryce Miller and Drake Kemper – plus veteran driver and Steve Saleen’s daughter, Molly Saleen.

The Saleen Cup’s “Young Drivers” class presents a unique opportunity for prospective young drivers who are looking to start a career in professional motorsports. The four entries in the Young Drivers class at Portland include: Austin Riley; Cameron Lawrence; Hanna Zellers and Carter Fartuch.

Portland Results – Pro-Am Drivers Class:

First Place – (#4) Brandon Davis (USA) / Paul Terry (USA)
Second Place – (#2) Zachary Lee (USA) / Bryce Miller (USA)
Third Place – (#6) Molly Saleen (USA) / Johan Schwartz (USA)

Portland Results – Young Drivers Class:

First Place – (#12) Austin Riley (CAN) / Carter Fartuch (USA)
Second Place – (#71) Hanna Zellers (USA)
Third Place – (#9) Cameron Lawrence (USA)

The Saleen Cup is presented via a partnership with SRO Motorsports Group, and runs concurrently with the Blancpain GT World Challenge America. Trackside tire support for the entire Saleen Cup is provided by series sponsor Continental Tires. In addition to offering prospective drivers and enthusiasts a turnkey, once-in-a-lifetime racing opportunity, the category champions in the Saleen Cup will each secure a factory seat driving in Saleen’s GT4 entry for the entire 2020 season. The Saleen Cup schedule includes four events through October 2019:

  • Portland International Raceway (Ore.) – July 12-14, 2019
  • Watkins Glen (NY) – August 30 – Sept. 1, 2019
  • Road America (Wis.)– Sept. 20-22, 2019
  • Grand Finale (Las Vegas) – Oct. 18-20, 2019

For more information on the Saleen Cup, visit www.SaleenCup.com. For more information on the Saleen 1 model, visit www.Saleen.com, or follow Saleen on social by using on Facebook at Facebook.com/Saleen, or by using @Saleen on Twitter and @Saleen on Instagram.

About Saleen Automotive, Inc.

Saleen is dedicated to transforming the transportation experience. For over 35 years, the California-based automotive manufacturer has redefined driving through high-performing vehicles that combine championship-winning racing pedigree with innovative technology and distinctive styling.

From the first Saleen Mustang in 1984 to the legendary S7 in 2000 and the groundbreaking new Saleen 1, founder Steve Saleen has continually set the bar for vehicle design and performance engineering on streets and racetracks worldwide. In addition to its distinctive Saleen Signature and Saleen Original vehicle lines, Saleen offers a wide variety of technical parts, lifestyle accessories and apparel for those with a passion for performance. Learn more at www.saleen.com.

Contacts
Media Contact:
Saleen PR – Collin Whitley
cwhitley@Saleen.com

[Source: Saleen Automotive]

FOUND: 93-0019 SUPERCHARGED

Model year 1993 marked the end of third-generation Ford Mustang production. An end to this familiar, boxy-shaped product with clear 1970s & 1980s design and engineering influences visible throughout. With a final year popularity surge, Ford Motor Company produced a total of 114,228 Mustang for 1993. Rough estimates claim that almost 50,000 of these swansong 1993 units were powered by the popular 5-Liter High-Output small block.

At Saleen Performance in Long Beach, California, their 1993 catalog of production models would see numerous updates and advancements continued from the previous year. 1993 is a best-of-the-best of ‘90s application and execution learned by Saleen for these final-run vehicles.

Produced after the New Year of ’93 and shipped to Danielson Ford in Connecticut on the 15th of January, 93-0019 is one of seven black exterior / black interior, 5-speed manual, supercharged hatchbacks produced for the year. One of four with optional 3.55:1 gearing and one of two with Saleen leather Recaro interior. These colors and options make 93-0019 the twin car to 93-0050 which was found hiding in Texas during 2015.

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CARLISLE FORD NATIONALS 2019 COVERAGE


Video: SOEC Staff

Early June signals the start of car show season for Ford fans living within the Northeast and Great Lakes region of the United States. The Carlisle Ford Nationals, presented annually at the Carlisle Fairgrounds in central Pennsylvania, had a record-setting 3,196 show vehicles in attendance for this east coast FoMoCo celebration.

An unofficial estimate of 54 Saleen-manufactured vehicles were proudly on display to exhibit Power In The Hands of a Few to all participants and admirers. Our collection of Saleen vehicles for Saturdays Fun Field Car Show ranged from those increasingly popular “four-eyed” 1985-86 editions to the latest 2019 SA-35 as well as rare XP Explorers and a S121 Focus.

With such a fruitful bounty of show cars, here were a few Saleen vehicles of note that we spied over the weekend:

  • The rarely seen California GT. These dealer “zone specials,” without Saleen serialization, are mythical and historical creatures.

  • Two Saleen SC editions, one from 1991 and the other from 1993; both vehicles respectfully represent a high-water mark for Fox generation Saleen Mustangs.

  • A lone SN95 Saleen S351. If the early ‘90s SC were a high-water mark, then the S351 was a multidimensional rocketship towards an innovative new era.

  • New S550 Saleen Mustangs, as the current generation S302 continues to roll through assembly for nationwide distribution, we see abundant opportunities for growth.

Gratitude and appreciation to all participants, enthusiasts and owners that makes this event so exceptional. Until next year!


Video: SOEC Staff

2019 Carlisle Ford Nationals award winners
—————————–

R148 – 1984 – 1993 SALEEN MUSTANG
384 – Frank Lomardi — 1989 Saleen Mustang — FIRST PLACE
385 – Karl LaFrance — 1993 Saleen Mustang — SECOND PLACE
* Celebrity Pick Chosen By Ken Appell Carlisle Ford Nationals — *SPECIAL AWARD*
386 – Matthew Baucke — 1989 Saleen Mustang — THIRD PLACE
387 – Michael Kaleda — 1991 Saleen Mustang
* Celebrity Pick Chosen By Lance Miller Carlisle Ford Nationals — *SPECIAL AWARD*
388 – Peter Filippatos — 1988 Saleen Mustang
* Celebrity Pick Chosen By Sean Saleen Saleen Automotive — *SPECIAL AWARD*
—————————–

R147 – 1994 – 2004 SALEEN MUSTANG
381 – Nick Yelovich — 2001 Saleen Mustang — FIRST PLACE
382 – Roseann Debella — 2002 Saleen Mustang — SECOND PLACE
383 – Shaun Nye 2000 — Saleen Mustang — THIRD PLACE
—————————–

R153 – 2005 – 2014 SALEEN MUSTANG
401 – Reginald Singleton — 2008 Saleen Mustang — FIRST PLACE
402 – Tom Cesare — 2006 Saleen Mustang — SECOND PLACE
403 – Theodore Falk — 2011 Saleen Mustang — THIRD PLACE
404 – Brandley Spotts — 2008 Saleen Mustang
* Celebrity Pick Chosen By Fran Cosentino Branded Club — *SPECIAL AWARD*
—————————–

R154 – 2015 – CURRENT SALEEN MUSTANG
405 – Justin & Belinda Warren — 2017 Saleen Mustang — FIRST PLACE
406 – Kenneth Bailey — 2016 Saleen Mustang — SECOND PLACE
407 – Reginald Singleton — 2015 Saleen Mustang — THIRD PLACE
—————————–

R155 – SALEEN POWERED
408 – Matt Trebuchon — 2014 Ford Expedition — FIRST PLACE
* Celebrity Pick Chosen By Mike Rey MOCSEM, Saleen Automotive — *SPECIAL AWARD*
409 – Ronald Belch — 2001 Saleen Explorer — SECOND PLACE
410 – Steven Wolfe — 2004 Saleen Focus — THIRD PLACE
—————————–

B328 2005 – 2007 FOCUS HATCHBACK (Non SVT)
83 – Cody Clinton — 2005 Saleen S121 — FIRST PLACE
—————————–

B316 – FACTORY MODS – INCLUDING POLICE VEHICLES
47 – Lisa & Brian Sams — 1991 Ford Mustang LX SSP — *SPECIAL AWARD*
* Celebrity Pick Chosen By: David Bruno, Saleen Owners and Enthusiasts Club

Award winning Lisa & Brian Sams 1991 Ford Mustang SSP
Award winning Lisa & Brian Sams 1991 Ford Mustang SSP

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GRASSROOTS MOTORSPORTS: CLASSIC COOL | SALEEN MUSTANG

Classic Cool
The Saleen Mustang

By: DAVID S. WALLENS on May 28, 2019
Original Article: GRASSROOTSMOTORSPORTS.COM

Time for a little history lesson. Don’t worry, the test will be open book. Back in the `60s, retired racer Carroll Shelby added enough spice to the then-new Mustang to turn it from hot to hotter. Today a legit one is a six-figure proposition–or more, as a one-of-one, GT40-powered Shelby GT500 Super Snake just sold for $2.2 million.

Now let’s jump forward. Steve Saleen, also a driver, followed a similar recipe and likewise offered his own hotted-up Mustangs through select Ford dealerships. The Saleen Mustang debuted for 1984, with the big performance upgrade being its Racecraft suspension: stiffer springs, Bilstein dampers, Goodyear Eagle GT tires and Hayashi alloy wheels.

The Saleen package also included some visual flair, like an `80s-appropriate aero kit; a leather-wrapped steering wheel and shift knob; and, of course, the requisite badges. Also standard: an Escort radar detector. In 1984 the Saleen package retailed for $4195 and could only be added to a Mustang L or LX coupe fitted with the 5.0-liter engine. Figure about $7100 for the Mustang itself.

Saleen offered modified Mustangs throughout the entire Fox-body run–and continues to reworks Ford’s latest. The firm tweaked the formula during the Fox-body years expanding to include upgrades like five-lug hubs, Hurst shifters and straight-through exhausts. Convertible and T-top cars were eventually put under the knife as well.

The firm offered more horsepower, too. The 1989 Saleen SSC celebrated the Mustang’s 25th birthday by adding a built engine, while a Vortech supercharger became optional for 1992, the year before the end of the Fox-body run.

Here’s the take-home message regarding these Fox-body Saleens: While the aftermarket has always offered the same upgrades, these cars have legit collector appeal. Those six-figure Shelbys? At one time they were just inexpensive used cars.

WHY YOU WANT ONE

• In a sea of Mustangs, here are the ones that stand out. Those now-iconic rocker panel stripes plus the Saleen windshield banner came standard.

• These were the days of a 55 mph national speed limit and 85 mph speedometers. A 170 mph clock was part of the original recipe.

• Saleen built as many as a few hundred Fox-body cars per year, so while rare, they’re not impossible to find. Complete year-by-year specs can be found on the Saleen Club of America website.

• The holy grail of Fox-body Saleens is the 1993 SA10. Only nine were built, each one to order. They all look the same, though: black hatchbacks sporting yellow and white graphics.

• A little birdy recently hinted that collector insurance quotes for Fox-body Mustangs are on the rise, so if you’d like to get ahead of the curve, this may be your chance.

PRACTICAL GUIDANCE

Our expert:
Mark LaMaskin

Performance Autosport, Inc.
performanceautosport.com
(804) 358-2505

They’re the `57 Chevy of our generation. I think it’s the time to buy Saleens and put them away. It’s a huge in-the-future collectible.

Stay away from modified cars. You don’t know who built it. Even a modified 5.0-liter Mustang isn’t that fast.

Buy the most expensive and nicest car that you can afford. You’ll never get ahead of the game by buying a restoration project.

The most prevalent years are 1987–`89.

Those were the largest production years. You can buy a really nice car for between 15 and 20 grand. The really, really nice cars are 25 grand and up.

You can’t get into a decent SSC for less than $25,000. They’re usually in the $40,000 range. Saleen made 17 supercharged hatchbacks in 1993. Those cars are $60,000 and up.

There’s a registry with all of the serial numbers. People can call Performance Autosport to authenticate every car.

Some of the parts are available and some aren’t. The one thing that I always tell people is avoid buying a car with torn-up seats.

The 1987–`91 cars had a Flo-Fit seat. Saleen had custom material made for those seats. You’re screwed if you buy an early car and the seats are hashed up.

No one makes material that looks close. I would buy an 80,000-mile car that looked like a 30,000-mile car before I bought a 30,000-mile car that was beat to poop.

The cars are fairly bulletproof.

RECENT SALE

Model: 1988 Mustang Saleen convertible
Price: $31,350
Condition: “Stock and unmodified condition”
From: Mecum at Indy, May 2018

RESOURCES

FlimFlam Speed & Custom Tuning
flimflamspeed.com
(804) 921-5341

Saleen Automotive, Inc.
saleen.com
(800) 888-8945

Saleen Club of America
saleenclubofamerica.com
(714) 400-2121

[Source: Grassroots Motorsports]

SOUR APPLE GREEN S302 SHOWN AT FABULOUS FORDS ’19

Saleen Automotive displayed their optional custom color Sour Apple Green paint during the 2019 Fabulous Fords Forever car show.

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[Source: Saleen Automotive]

ALPHALUXE: SALEEN S7 ALL-AMERICAN HOLISTIC SUPERCAR

Saleen S7 All-American Holistic Supercar

By: JOSH LOWE on February 13, 2019
Original Article: ALPHALUXE.COM

Saleen Automotive
The Saleen brand was established in 1983 originally as Saleen Autosport. Steve Saleen is a racer: a former professional Formula Atlantic race driver. Racing is at the heart of what Saleen has been doing for more than 30 years: Building fast cars and trucks that can compete on both street and circuit. Simple enough, it seems. But there’s more to it than that. Being fast isn’t just about closing the gap between points A and B. It’s about balance and consistency. And it has to be accomplished within the rules. It requires a “big picture” perspective because a driver’s car is more than just a collection of systems.

Saleen Supercar S7 (photo by Josh L) @alphaluxe
Saleen Supercar S7 (photo by Josh L) @alphaluxe

Building a well-balanced sports car, be it for the track or for the street, requires a holistic approach. This was demonstrated in August 2000, when Saleen unveiled the S7. The first successful American supercar that also became a successful race car, securing a class win at the 2010 edition of the 24 Hours of Le Mans as well as an upset victory at Imola in 2004, in front of Ferrari’s executives, VIPs, and journalists.

Saleen HQ

Saleen Automotive (photo by Josh L) @alphaluxe
Saleen Automotive (photo by Josh L) @alphaluxe

We arrived at Saleen’s Corona, California headquarters on a rainy January morning. After amiable introductions, we were given a guided tour of the facilities by the man himself. As we passed through the workshop filled with Mustangs and trucks in various stages of completion we’re given an overview of the company. A dark red Saleen Mustang from the 1980s is parked in one corner and a pre-production example of the upcoming S1 sports car reposes nearby.

Steve Saleen shows S7 LM engineering (photo by Josh L) @alphaluxe
Steve Saleen shows S7 LM engineering (photo by Josh L) @alphaluxe

Saleen guides us through the workshop, describing the extent to which they alter the cars and trucks that are eventually offered for sale. Saleen not only has to deliver improved performance, it also must be tested and certified for use on public roads. The Mustangs that Saleen sells are extensively changed from their factory configurations. Only the doors and quarter panels remain unchanged, according to Saleen. But, he also points out that designing the S7 from the ground up freed them from having to implement the workarounds associated with re-engineering an existing platform, such as the Mustang.

S7 Development

Saleen Supercar S7 back black (photo by Josh L) @alphaluxe
Saleen Supercar S7 back black (photo by Josh L) @alphaluxe

As we move through the R&D area, Saleen recounts the early development of the S7. The green light to build the car was given in December 1999 and it was formally unveiled in August 2000. It was first visualized in one-fifth scale foam, then in CAD. It was wind-tunnel tested at the University of Glasgow in Scotland. Assembly took place at Saleen’s previous facility in Irvine, California. The original iteration of the S7 was powered by a naturally aspirated, 7-liter, aluminum small block V8. The final product was a head-turning, mid-engine, 550 horsepower, American supercar. If not the absolute first of its kind it’s certainly more credible and successful than the Vector W8 and M12. The S7 promised a 3.3 second 0-60 time and an 11.3 second standing quarter mile. It also promised a future on the race track.

Saleen Supercar S7 LM cockpit (photo by Josh L) @alphaluxe
Saleen Supercar S7 LM cockpit (photo by Josh L) @alphaluxe

When asked if the 24 Hours of Le Mans was specifically taken into consideration when designing the S7, Saleen’s answer is short and direct: “Racing was taken into consideration.” Not a specific race or circuit, not even a track with the unique demands of the Circuit de la Sarthe. This comment resonates. It’s not about specific numbers. It’s the whole picture. The S7 was built to be both a street legal supercar and a race car that could compete at the highest levels. Relatively little separates the two. The S7 was made to go racing and that’s exactly what it did.

The racing variant of the S7, dubbed S7-R, made its racing debut at Laguna Seca in October 2000. Less than six months later, the S7-R won its class and finished sixth overall at the 12 Hours of Sebring. Then came a podium finish and an 18th place overall finish at Le Mans. The S7-R went on to compete and succeed in multiple sports cars and endurance racing series for nearly 10 years.

Winning Ways

Saleen S7 LM (photo by Josh L) @alphaluxe
Saleen S7 LM (photo by Josh L) @alphaluxe

In 2004, the S7-R raced at the FIA GT 500 km of Imola. Ferrari Chairman Luca di Montezemolo had convened a gathering of motoring press and VIPs to celebrate the racing debut and “inevitable” victory of the Maserati MC12. The MC12 was essentially a rebodied Ferrari Enzo and the team running the two entries at Imola was comprised of elements of Ferrari’s factory Formula 1 team.

“They brought everyone in from the Formula 1 team to run [the MC12] with the exception of Michael Schumacher. Jean Todt, who was the [F1] team manager, oversaw the operation. All of their mechanics, and they even had Mika Salo as their main driver.” – Steve Saleen

During what was supposed to be an easy win for Ferrari, the Vitaphone Racing Team had intentions of their own. Drivers Michael Bartels and Uwe Alzen powered the #5 Saleen S7-R to an overall victory at Imola, in front of Ferrari’s home crowd. The all-American S7-R supercar clinched overall victory at Ferrari’s home track Autodromo Enzo e Dino Ferrari against two Maserati MC12, three Ferrari 550, three Ferrari 575 and two Lamborghini Murciélago in the GT Class.

Di Montezemolo issued a public mea culpa, crediting the competition for a clear-cut victory. In 2010, the S7-R went on to achieve an LMGT1 class victory and 13th place overall at the 24 Hours of Le Mans. The S7-R had proven itself to still be competitive at a high level nearly 10 years after it was originally designed. Considering the rate at which sports and endurance racing cars age into obsolescence, this was a remarkable feat.

Back to the Future

Saleen S7 LM assembly area (photo by Josh L) @alphaluxe
Saleen S7 LM assembly area (photo by Josh L) @alphaluxe

At this point of the tour, we’re led to an enclosed workshop occupied by three S7 chassis in various stages of completion. They are part of the final run of 7 cars, called the LeMans Edition. These cars boast an output of 1,100 horsepower on California 91 octane fuel. But they have a trick up their figurative sleeves, too: They can also run E85 flex fuel. The S7-LM has a sensor that detects if E85 is present and automatically raises the output of the twin turbo V8 engine to a staggering 1,300 horsepower. The weight of the car is nearly unchanged, thus giving the S7-LM a serious power-to-weight ratio.

Saleen S7 LM wheel hubs and brakes (photo by Josh L) @alphaluxe
Saleen S7 LM wheel hubs and brakes (photo by Josh L) @alphaluxe

Two of the S7-LM are in the early stages of construction and the third appears to be a finished car. It’s a bit of heaven for car nerds. Suspension components, crash structures, and other components that aren’t easily seen on completed vehicles can be closely examined. We’re given an opportunity to see just how beefy and well-machined some of the mechanical pieces like the wheel hubs are. At one point, we’re handed a carbon composite door. Even with glass installed the entire door only weighs about 13 pounds.

Saleen S7 LM Door (photo by Josh L) @alphaluxe
Saleen S7 LM Door (photo by Josh L) @alphaluxe

Saleen then described the process of testing and re-testing the crash box at the front of the car. Not only does it protect occupants, it also protects the suspension. Saleen explains that the S7 was designed to withstand a significant front impact without compromising the suspension. This kind of durability is a benefit on both a street or a race car, and it harkens back to the holistic approach to building cars that Saleen uses.

Saleen Supercar S7 LM protection cell (photo by Josh L) @alphaluxe
Saleen Supercar S7 LM protection cell (photo by Josh L) @alphaluxe

Finishing Line

Saleen Supercar S1 (photo by Josh L) @alphaluxe
Saleen Supercar S1 (photo by Josh L) @alphaluxe

Motorsports fans may look back at the days of Ford vs. Ferrari at Le Mans with fondness and nostalgia, but it’s worth noting that the fight didn’t end in the 1960s. The names and participants may have changed, but that racing spirit lived on and will hopefully continue to do so as the Saleen S7 becomes eligible to participate in historic racing. There are discussions about an S7 Reunion to be held in Monterey, in 2020.

Saleen intends to design and manufacture cars under the Saleen name. Unveiled at the 2017 Los Angeles Auto Show, the Saleen S1 is due to launch in 2019. The S1 sports a 450 horsepower, mid-mounted, turbocharged 4 cylinder engine. While it’s not a monster like the S7, the S1 clearly shares its lineage. There racing plans for the S1 too. Hardly a surprise when looking back to the start: Steve Saleen is a racer.


In the Side-View Mirror by Michael Gallardo

Our visit to Saleen was a great experience. Steve broke down the two major sides of business: “Signature” and “Original.” The Signature side consists of chassis delivered from an existing manufacturer being modified to Saleen’s specifications including the S302 and the Sportruck. The Original side of the business is where the really special stuff happens such as the S1 and the almighty (no pun intended) S7.

Saleen S7 LM assembly 2 (photo by Josh L) @alphaluxe
Saleen S7 LM assembly 2 (photo by Josh L) @alphaluxe

We were shown the process of the S302 builds and were able to see all of the detail that Saleen puts into their cars. Steve told us “Everything on the cars has a purpose…” and proceeded to point out various aspects of aerodynamics that were focused on when designing the new generation of Saleen Mustang. Saleen offers three levels of builds on the S302: White Label, Yellow Label, and Black Label. Each one comes with a warranty and plenty of options to choose from.

After showing us the Signature side, we went to a separate building where the Original side of operations is. We were shown the new S7 Le Mans Edition in three different forms.

Saleen S7 LM cockpit assembly (photo by Josh L) @alphaluxe
Saleen S7 LM cockpit assembly (photo by Josh L) @alphaluxe

The first form was essentially bare chassis and we were shown how the design is extremely safe as it was meant to have the driver survive a crash at an extreme rate of speed rather than just being designed to pass the typical safety standards. Next to it was another chassis with interior bits and some other things added, then finally the complete car.

Saleen Supercar S7 LM front (photo by Josh L) @alphaluxe
Saleen Supercar S7 LM front (photo by Josh L) @alphaluxe

When asked about the future, Steve said, “We have two other cars [besides the S1, S7, etc…] beyond the drawing board that you’ll see here in the future…”

It is very clear that the company has some new tricks up their sleeves and it will be exciting to see what comes next for Saleen.

[Source: AlphaLuxe]

SPP PRE-ORDER FOR 1999 THROUGH 2009 WHEELS

From our friend Spring Hebler.

Saleen Performance Parts to Reintroduce Wheels for 1999 through 2009 Saleen Mustangs

Breaking News!

Saleen Performance has just announced they are taking pre-orders for these long-obsolete and much-in-demand Saleen Mustang wheel sets for your 1999-04 and 2005-09 Mustang.

Whether it’s the 1999-04 5-spoke, 18″x9″/10″ wheels, or the 2005-09 7-spoke “Wagon Wheel” style, 20″x9″/10″ wheels, pre-order yours today!

Pre-orders must be prepaid, with a production forecast of 5-6 months. Sold in full sets only. Available in standard silver metallic or chrome.

For details and to provide payment information, please contact Spring Hebler at Saleen Performance via email, shebler@saleenperformance.com or call 800-888-8945 with your name, phone number and desired vehicle fitment.

You can also join Spring’s list on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/spring.c.hebler

Be sure to mention you saw it on the Saleen Forums at soec.org!

Remember, you must pre-order and pre-pay to help make this happen and to guarantee you get your wheels!

Click here to participate in the discussion.

RESTORATION COMPLETE: SALEEN S7 03-031R

By: FLORENT MOULIN

We are very proud to present a selection of pictures of the Saleen S7R GT1 chassis 031R after its in-house restoration by Art & Revs. It was a real joy and moment of pride to put the car in our studio after working so hard for such a result.

The great 031R was ordered together with 029R in late 2003 by ACEMCO, an important US company in the motor car industry in the US. The aim was to compete at the highest level in ALMS and Le Mans, notably against the factory Corvettes ran by Pratt & Miller. ACEMCO had by this time built up a fantastic racing team around Ron Mack and Jim Bell.

This legendary car raced in the 2005 ALMS including an 8th overall finish at Sebring 12 Hours and it finished second in the Championship. The pinnacle of its history came certainly in 2006 when it raced at Le Mans 24 hours, finishing an impressive 11th place overall, making 031R the first Saleen to ever finish the world’s most prestigious endurance race. This important result bears testimony to the car’s performance and reliability.

The car was not used in 2007 and 2008, and was sold to Europe in 2009 to be raced in the FIA GT Championship with K Plus K, driven by Karl Wendlinger and Ryan Sharp, notably winning Silverstone’s Tourist Trophy among other motorsport firsts. Back then the competition between Maserati, Aston Martin, Ferrari and Saleen was at its height.

Very few know the S7R’s history and that the first series of S7Rs were actually engineered and built at RML in UK. However the « Evo » version was totally re-engineered by Saleen in their all new factory at Irvine in California, this is where they also built the 4,000 Ford GTs on behalf of Ford. 029R & 031R were the first Evo cars built and accordingly benefited from all new chassis, suspension, gearbox and aero. The Saleen S7 7.0 liter engines were in fact built from Ford`s 5.0 liter « small » block and reliability has always been a real issue. It has to be said that the engines built at Roush-Yates have always been disappointing and notably deprived most of the S7Rs from finishing Le Mans.

In the first stages of their Saleen project, ACEMCO being generously funded, contracted Panoz ( Elan Technologies ) to build up a 7.0 liter version of their largely proven LMP900 engine, originally a 6.0 liter. The Elan 7.0 liter was a total success and ACEMCO would never retire because of an engine failure. In unrestricted specifications, 031R’s engine recently shown 728 HP on the dyno at Elan after its rebuild. Only the two original ACEMCO cars would actually be equipped with the fantastic Elan engine and four units were built.

031R was completely stripped down to its bare components by Art & Revs and meticulously restored and reassembled by our highly skilled staff, most of whom have a large experience in Formula 1 or Endurance.All of the car’s components were reconditioned or replaced in close collaboration with the original suppliers wherever possible, just like the engine which was rebuilt at Elan. For safety purposes, the major components were crack tested.

This highly iconic silver S7R is now ready for new adventures on the historic racing scene and more widely in the classic car world. This is a great part of the Saleen S7R legend, the first all-American supercar to ever compete at Le Mans and in major international championships.

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[Source: Art & Revs]

22nd ANNUAL SALEEN CAR SHOW & OPEN HOUSE

PHOTOS: SOEC MEMEBERSHIP

2018 marked the 22nd year of our annual Saleen Show and Open House. This year, attendees were treated to a special presentation for the 2019 SA-35 Mustang. This 35th anniversary edition will exclusively be available in black paint with yellow and white accents. The SA-35 will be limited to a production run of 10 units.

A number of special Saleen vehicles were on display from past model years. Unique and custom paint vehicles as well as previous anniversary editions.

Our festivities closed with an award presentation recognizing attendees with the “longest distance traveled” and top three vehicles in each show class. A festive Saturday enjoyed by all!

We thank the Saleen community for your continued support. See you next year.

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FMM: SALEEN’S 1988 R-MODEL RACER

MUSTANG BIO
Fox Afire – Saleen’s ’88 R-Model Racer

By: MARK LAMASKIN & KEVIN ADOLF on March 2014
Photos: KEVIN ADOLF
Original Article: FOX MUSTANG MAGAZINE

Collection of General Tire Saleen Mustangs
Collection of General Tire Saleen Mustangs

Race on Sunday; sell on Monday. It’s an old adage that’s been around for decades, and it has worked for car manufactures all over the world, including Saleen.

Most know that Steve Saleen began building custom street cars in the mid-’80s. What many don’t know is that by 1986 Steve was building and racing Saleen R-models. Saleen built 16 factory R-models, fewer even than Shelby’s 26 R-models. Because as few were built, it’s even rarer to see one in person, let alone four under one roof.

The most recognized Saleen race cars are nicknamed the “bumble-bee” cars from 1987 to 1989. Saleen built only eight of these R-models from brand-new cars, and they were destined to be race cars from day one.

1987 Race Team
1987 Race Team

Saleen campaigned these cars from 1986 to 1989 in an endurance race series, constantly testing them at 12- to 24-hour races with multiple drivers. The venue, the SCCA Escort Endurance Race Series, was sponsored by the Escort Radar Detector company. Escort and Saleen had other partnerships throughout the Fox-body ages, since an Escort radar detector was an option when purchasing a Saleen from the dealer. The Escort Endurance Series was intended to showcase the best that all the manufactures had to offer and was better known as Showroom Stock, meaning the cars had to be raced in the same trim as if you purchased the car off the showroom floor. Keeping the cars mostly stock was to deter “ringers” from being custom built by the manufacturers. All cars had to have a production VIN, and only minor modifications were allowed.

88-0020R Saleen Mustang
88-0020R Saleen Mustang

The only allowable engine modification was engine blue-printing and balancing for durability, while for the suspension, shock and spring changes were about it. As for interiors, all cars had to have a SCCA-approved roll cage, fire system, and race seats. Other than those few changes, the cars were stock inside. The passenger seat was a stock Saleen Flofit. The door panels were still stitched with the Saleen logo. The dash was stock. All of the interior panels were truly Showroom Stock. That’s about where “stock” ends with these cars, though.

As with any form of racing, Showroom Stock or not, if you want to be out in front you need to push the boundaries a bit. Saleen went one step further by hiring Dave Dixon, a former F1 engine builder, to head up their engine program. A factory-stock Mustang 5.0 would put down about 200 rwhp on a chassis dyno, but a Dixon-built motor put down 265 rwhp, giving the Saleen team a distinct advantage over its competitors.

Dixon had the task of finding a little more horsepower out of the completely stock power plant while keeping the overall appearance as stock so the SCCA officials would be none the wiser. One way he found extra power was to use a set of preproduction GT-40 cylinder heads with a stock E7 casting equipped with a set of factory-appearing, stamped rocker arms with a larger ratio. During a visual inspection, they looked completely stock. Another trick was a then-new process called Extrude Hone, running an abrasive material through the intake runners under pressure to open them up without creating visible porting marks as with grinding. This increased the flow to match the GT-40-style cylinder heads.

88-0020R Saleen Mustang
88-0020R Saleen Mustang

To help hide the unapproved modifications that Dixon had done to the cylinder heads, he had them shot-peened to look like factory castings. Inside the engine, one last mod was a custom camshaft that Dixon spec’d with stock life values, but with custom overlap and duration which was optimized for the high rpm seen during road racing. Another trick Dixon found was a Lincoln LSC speed-density intake tube, which flows more air than the stock Mustang piece. As well, he took the stock Ford headers and slightly ported them to increase exhaust flow. Behind the headers, all R-models used a Ford Motorsport off-road pipe and 2 ¼-inch DynoMax mufflers.

Another thing you may notice is that ALL of the ’87-’89 Saleen R-models are Speed Density and not Mass-Air. Dixon found that the stock Speed Density computers worked better with these modifications but needed to be upgraded to 24-pound injectors to compensate for the increased airflow. Dixon would actually have Saleen try dozens of ECUs to find the best one for each motor since they had to be factory sealed and never tampered with. This may sound like a lot of work to go Showroom Stock racing, but… well, welcome to racing.

Collection of General Tire Saleen Mustangs
Collection of General Tire Saleen Mustangs

The cars ran stock T-5 transmissions, but they too were blueprinted to ensure reliability under 24-hour abuse. Ratios remained stock, but Saleen would use 3.55:1 and 3.08:1 rear gear ratios, depending on the track. The rear differentials were prototype parts from Auburn. The “Pro” differentials they currently sell was prototyped on the Saleen race cars. This a cone-type differential that gave the Saleen Rs a better launch off the corners.

These completed engine packages also included hidden stamps on all of the parts. Each engine was issued a specific number, so when they were rebuilt none of the parts got mixed up.

The tricks of the bumble-bee cars did not end with just the drivetrain. Saleen also massaged the body to accommodate 8-inch-wide wheels in the front with one inch of added track width. This additional front track kept the cars square with the additional inch of rear track from the Saleen rear disc brakes with 8-inch rear wheels. The ’86-’88 cars ran the stock Saleen brakes on all four corners, but the ’89 cars ran a set of upgraded JFZ front brakes because Ford offered them in the Motorsports catalog. Saleen’s tire sponsor was General Tire, and they provided the team with G-compound race rubber that was much wider than the tire size branded on the side of the tires – another advantage Saleen.

Suspension was also not quite stock. Saleen installed harder bushings in a few of the control arms, and each car had specific springs to account for the driver’s weight and to optimize corner balance and cross weights. The ’88 cars had 750-pound fronts and 300-pound rears, depending on the track, but the later ’89 cars ran 1,000-pount front. With all of these modifications the cars were still close to factory weight due to the addition of the roll cages, but they started lighter than stock due to the lack of A/C and other power options.

The racing history for each car is unique because there could be as many as five drivers at any one race. The list of drivers for these Saleen R-models reads as a “who’s who” of late-80s’ big name drivers, including Tommy and Bobby Archer, Calvin Fish, Rick Titus, Pete Halsmer, George Follmer, Desire Wilson, Lisa Caceras, and of course, Steve Saleen. The tracks they raced are also renowned: Road Atlanta, Mosport, Mid-Ohio, Sebring, Sears Point, Portand, Road America, and Brainerd.

ABOUT OUR FEATURE CAR
Today, its racing days are over, this rare racer resides at Performance Autosport in Richmond, Virginia, part of a set of four General Tire bumble-bee Saleen R-models. Owner Mark LaMaskin and a Performance Autosport customer have carefully preserved this part of Fox Mustang history. But even as pedigreed R-model racers with obvious collectability, these cars still get exercised at the track now and then – keeps ’em happy.
88-0020R Saleen Mustang
88-0020R Saleen Mustang

SPECIFICATIONS:
PRODUCTION
Saleen R-Model 1987-89 8
DIMENSIONS
Wheelbase (inches) 100.5
Overall length (inches) 179.6
Overall width (inches) 69.1
Height, hardtop and hatchback (inches) 52.1
Front track (inches) 57.1
Rear track (inches) 57.0
Curb weight (pounds) 2,890
Base price $21,500 (est) – Street Model
Current est. value depending on race history $60,000-$90,000
ENGINE
Type V-8
Bore and stroke (inches) 302
Displacement (CID/liters) 5.0
Compression ratio 9.2:1
Horsepower, factory rating 225 @ 4200 rpm
Torque, factory rating 300 @ 3200 rpm
Horsepower, actual rwhp on chassis dyno 253 @ 5000 rpm
Torque, actual rw torque on chassis dyno 308 @ 3600 rpm
Induction EFI
Camshaft single, in block
Valve size, intake/exhaust (inches) 1.78/1.46
Exhaust dual pipes/mufflers, off-road H-pipe
SUSPENSION
Front suspension modified MacPherson hydraulic shock struts with coil springs and stabilizer bar
Rear suspension four-bar link and coil spring system, w/anti-sway bar
Steering power-assisted rack-and-pinion
Brakes, front power-assisted 11-inch rotors – single piston calipers
Brakes, rear SVO rear disc – single piston
Tires General XP2000Z – 245/50/16
DRIVETRAIN
Transmission, manual (standard) T-5 five-speed
Axle Ratio 3.55:1
PERFORMANCE
Quarter-mile (seconds) 13.9
0-60 (seconds) 5.8

[Source: Fox Mustang Magazine]